There is no Such Thing as “Self Defense”. It takes an Animal to Fight an Animal (Part 1)

On our Tang Wei related YouTube channel organized by Wu Jin Dao Training Group, we have compiled several Engagement Scenarios on a playlist titled “Engagement Scenario Examples”.  These are collected from various sources having CCTV footage or news footage of actual assaults taking place (viewer discretion advised as there is adult content of violence).

As an instructor, these videos are infuriating and are a powerful reminder of the necessity of maintaining your combat mindset as well as strategic and tactical skill sets to back up the mindset.  In the martial arts world, you have sport forms and combat forms.  The combat forms are often referred to as Reality Based Self Defense (RBSD) systems.  I suppose you would say that this is where Tang Wei would fall into the mix as well.

When dealing with mentally disturbed individuals who attack with deadly weapons (especially blades like machetes and knives) or gangs/groups of individuals filled with mob mentality bent on harming others.

What you have to recognize is that you are NOT dealing with people in the usual sense, you are dealing with a person that has given themselves over into an animalistic state.  The primary philosophies of instruction as to how to counter these types of attacks vacillate between whether to focus on defending and trapping the knife arm or counter striking.  The mindset is often that of someone who has already capitulated defeat and just wants to “make it out of there alive” by using some form of prescriptive defense.  But when you watch these real-life videos you must realize that you are not dealing with a person throwing a prescribed attack, you are dealing with an animal dressed in human clothing bent on destruction.  You will not survive an animal through defense.

Self Defense is really a poor description of what works in real life.  You need to live a life committed to peace, following basic rules of avoiding all combat whenever avoidable, including diffusing situations and walking away whenever that is a viable option.  However, if you find yourself in a situation where avoidance is not an option and you have to engage, you need to give yourself permission to switch into an alternative mode.

It takes an animal to bring down another animal or even to fight through an ambush and escape once thrust into a combative engagement.  The tactics and strategies that you learn in your combat system must also focus on ending the fight quickly and training you to be adaptable so you can go wherever the fight goes.

Martial arts, strategies and tactics however must not be thought of as a replacement for your primitive instincts, for your own animalistic instructive mode.  Living a peaceful life does not have to mean that when you are threatened or a loved one is in danger that you can’t switch to your survival mode and bring the fight to the enemy like an animal protecting all that it holds dear.

One of the best compliments that myself and several other practitioners of Tang Wei have received about Tang Wei after demonstrations is that it doesn’t move like other martial arts.  I remember a visitor at a past demonstration saying that our techniques look like some sort of “an animal pouncing upon and going to work on its prey”.

At final count that is the idea.  We certainly will not start a fight, but if it comes and you don’t give us a way out, you will find that we will bring the fight back to you.  In Tang Wei we don’t care about looking like a martial artist.  Whether the fight will be empty handed, with a knife, stick, firearm, etc., we are concerned only about ending the fight quickly (and appropriately) then getting back to our lives.

Tang Wei training serves this philosophy, focusing upon gathering the best information from all available sources but then using various sets, techniques and power concepts not for mere memorization but for extracting and ingraining adaptable core skills which can upgrade how we operate when we have to switch into a fighting mode.  Upgrading in the sense of having higher levels of power output, better ability to access debilitating targets, faster transitions to suppress the enemy’s actions and take control of the fight, better strategies for setting ourselves up for advantage before any blows are exchanged, etc.

In summary, develop a personal code of when it is appropriate and necessary to switch into your own animalistic combat mode, employing more refined forms of the same type of “real” intent and as the attackers you plan to combat.  You will never “defend” yourself out of a fight.  You won’t survive an assault by an animalistic person through any form of a defensive mindset.  You turn the tables and bring the fight back to the enemy to make them feel that choosing you as a target was the worst decision they have ever made.  This is the basis of mindset; it can get you a long way towards success.  You need counter strategies and tactics which either take pre-emptive offensive action or immediately counter attack and turn to the press.  Other than that, you will end up on defense and you will be toast.

Do not see yourself as a victim or a “self-defender” trying to “survive” an assault.  This is the wrong mindset.  Make the rule that you never fight for anything that is not worth fighting for.  You fight only for your life and the life of those you love enough to risk your life protecting.  When this is necessary, become an animal and take the fight with full intent and commitment into the enemy.  Take the press and turn the tables, placing them so firmly on defense that they are overwhelmed physically, mentally and emotionally so they have no time or ability to think about harming you.  If avoidance is not available, then this is your best and only approach to making it through a real assault.

Kyle W.

Tang Wei Senior Instructor

May 2017 Tang Wei Special Events

Tang Wei Street Survival Seminar: Dealing with Deceptive Surprise Assaults

  • Date/Time: Saturday May 6, 2017
  • Location: Salt Lake Community College Larry H Miller Campus, Miller Professional Development Center, 9690 South 300 West, Sandy, UT 84070
  • Lead Instructors: Tang Wei Head Instructor Tom Garriga. Senior Instructors Kyle Whiteley, Adam Adair, Bruce Young, Kody Jones.  Instructors Jake Black, Joel Black, David Miller.
  • Capacity: 25 Slots
  • Cost: $80 pre-registration, $100 at the door. $50 for current Law Enforcement and Military Personnel or students currently enrolled in a Tang Wei Training Group.
  • Pre-register at: http://www.signupgenius.com/go/10c0a48aaae2ca6f85-tang8
  • Equipment: None
  • Details:

Many assaults including carjacking, armed robberies, home invasions, and hate crime targeted assaults will involve an attacker/attackers approaching you under a false pretext to deceive you and then surprise attacking you.  These situations present a unique challenge as we are often approached by people in our daily lives in contexts which do not represent a combative threat.  You need a strong understanding counter ambush strategies and tactics to go with your combat mindset to deal with these type of attacks.

This seminar will build the standard core skill sets of the Tang Wei Fighting Method but will focus on applying those skills in response to deceptive surprise assaults.  The first half of the seminar will build the generic mindset, strategies and tactics needed for success in dealing with a deceptive assault.  This half of the seminar will focus upon power output, targeting, and adaptable fighting entries.

The second half of the seminar will focus on application.  The generic skills learned in the first half of the seminar will be expanded upon and applied using scenario drills and training exercises allowing the participants to develop their own ability to spontaneously respond to empty handed assaults and concealed weapon assaults.

 

Fighting Out of Disadvantage Workshop: Counters for Being Held at Knife and Gun Point

  • Date/Time: May 6, 2017 from 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm
  • Location: Salt Lake Community College Larry H Miller Campus, Miller Professional Development Center, 9690 South 300 West, Sandy, UT 84070
  • Lead Instructors: Tang Wei Head Instructor Tom Garriga. Senior Instructors Kyle Whiteley, Adam Adair, Bruce Young, Kody Jones.  Instructors Jake Black, Joel Black, David Miller.
  • Capacity: 25 Students
  • Cost: $25 for Pre-Registered, $30 at the door. $20 for Current Law Enforcement, Military or students actively enrolled in a Tang Wei Training Group, or those who attend seminar earlier in the day.
  • Pre-register at: http://www.signupgenius.com/go/10c0a48aaae2ca6f85-fighting
  • Details:

Armed robberies, many home invasions, carjacking, rapes and several other crimes all depend upon being able to hold the intended victim at gun or knife point.  While the preferred option is to avoid such situations or to counter the assailant before they are able to put you in such a position, what do you do if errors have already been made and you need to fight out of this type of disadvantage?

This workshop will focus on teaching efficient reversals, counters and escapes facing various holds both standing and on the ground where the enemy is holding you at knife or gun point.

 

Fight Finishing Workshop: Maximizing Power Output for Grappling Finishes

  • Date/Time: May 6, 2017 from 3:00 P.M.to 5:00 P.M.
  • Location: Salt Lake Community College Larry H Miller Campus, Miller Professional Development Center, 9690 South 300 West, Sandy, UT 84070
  • Lead Instructors: Tang Wei Head Instructor Tom Garriga. Senior Instructors Kyle Whiteley, Adam Adair, Bruce Young, Kody Jones.  Instructors Jake Black, Joel Black, David Miller.
  • Capacity: 25 Students
  • Cost: $25 for Pre-Registered, $30 at the door. $20 for Current Law Enforcement, Military or students actively enrolled in a Tang Wei Training Group, or those who attend seminar earlier in the day.
  • Pre-register at: http://www.signupgenius.com/go/10c0a48aaae2ca6f85-tang9
  • Details:

Power output is often an insurmountable factor in a fight whether it is for or against you.  In most people’s eyes, power output is determined by size, strength and basic physical prowess.  While athletic attributes can help with power, often athleticism translates much less into effective power output than effective knowledge, skill and specific coordination habits.

One of the signature features of the Tang Wei Fighting Method is our collection of power drills and concepts which allows tremendous increases in power output which can negate large disadvantages in size and strength and enjoy a power output advantage over larger adversaries through superior skill in terms of power generation.

This workshop will cover several physical and mental power concepts from the Tang Wei Fighting Method while focusing on applying them to grappling methods for finishing a fight.  Targeting will be covered for application of low, medium and high levels of force.  Power output and fight finishing is the core skill set which other tactics and strategies are built around, a thorough understanding of it is a must for anyone that studies close quarters fighting.